Life and Death

Recently I’ve done a couple funerals for friends that have passed away.

Funerals always bring me to contemplation and reflection. I trust that as you encounter the reality of our own frailty, they invoke within you the same cause for pause and taking account of priorities, what truly matters and your life.

They always make me ponder things like:

  • my faith in God…an assurance that stabilize me, but also those difficult questions…
  • they bring up questions – some are answerable, some are not…
  • they remind me of the brevity of life – remind me to savor it…
  • family and our relationship – the quality of my relationships…
  • my own limitations and boundaries…
  • my priorities and my pace of living…
  • am I living for a big enough story (God’s) or have I settled (for only mine)?…
  • my own end – what will be said of me?…

 

There are many other emotions and thoughts that get generated. I’m sure you’ve had a few as well.

Feel free to jot your questions and thoughts in the comment section and we can discuss.

I thought I’d include a note that was recorded by one of the gentleman who is recently deceased. He wrote this down many years ago, but I believe his words are as fresh today for a hungry and searching world. Jim was a godly man who knew well how to live out of the foundational pursuits of loving God and loving people. His relationship with Christ was as authentic as it gets. He wrote about “what he learned in life”…I thought it poignant.

May it stir you to ponder and think… (consider the words of Moses in Psalm 90 as well)

WHAT I HAVE LEARNED

I have learned through observation and personal experience that sensual

pleasures are at best only temporary and being oft repeated, invariably lose

their charm.  But intellectual and spiritual pursuits yield an ever growing and

stimulating joy because they awaken and call to activity a man’s primary

and only lasting source of happiness—a harmonious relationship with God.

his creator.

                                        By James R. Corcoran  (written in the 1960’s)

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